R∴ W∴ Charles R. Smith
Grand Treasurer

A Message from the Grand Treasurer,

I would like to open this message with a challenge. How many of you ever thought of yourself as a 100% Mason? How would you like “100% Mason” somewhere on your epitaph or within your eulogy? Yes, I know, those are hypothetical questions. However, when certain articles really grab my attention, I have a tendency to save them. There is one such article that keeps coming to mind from the Indiana Freemason written in 1923. Our Scottish Rite saw fit to redistribute it for us. Here are a few choice paragraphs from the article:

With such a character uppermost, my theme has significant power, one hundred percent mason. A Mason, etymologically viewed, is a select and superior man. He rises above conventional and brings an ordinary type of character to an exalted plane He is not satisfied to join a lodge along superficial lines. He enters masonry to face better issues of life to be a nobler patriot, a truer citizen, and a more exemplary man. For him, the name “Mason” implies character and attainment. Loves to be in the lodge and the company of his brethren. He wants to help in every way possible to make his connection count. Having been brought from darkness to light, his sole desire is to see the same glorious results in others. His life is a constant prayer, the lodge-room a real temple of duplication. The Bible as the great light of Masonry illuminates his soul. He finds the practice of all of the virtues that have due regard for its sacred pages which keeps him in daily touch with his Maker.

The Shekinah Light from the alter never fails to help him to positive duty and to perfect trust in the Great Architect of the universe. He is a builder, making earthly hours a real spiritual habitation. Wherever he goes, such a man carries with him a crystallized representation of human brotherhood and divine fatherhood. He has caught the vision of Shakespeare’s fine lines:

“This above all, to thine own self be true. And with it will follow, as the night the day. Thou can’t then be false to any man.

We in all our lodges one hundred percent Masons. We can spare “knife and fork” and mere “ritual” Masons, to gain superior types of the Craft. Not quantity, but quality, is our great aim for Indiana today.

I believe most of us will find the masonic principles incorporated in these few paragraphs worthy of consideration. Or better yet, even strive to make them part of our behavior patterns. Another hypothetical: Do the readers of this message today have concerns of straying from the rich tradition that has made our fraternity great in the past? There are many other examples to consider way beyond these just within those few paragraphs, as well.

Fraternally,
R∴ W∴ Charles R. Smith
Grand Treasurer